Education

(1) In the educational world an apprehension of man’s true nature will bring about a fundamental change in the methods of teaching. The emphasis will be laid upon teaching people the fact of the Ego on its own plane, the nature of the lunar bodies, and the methods of aligning the lower bodies so that the Ego can communicate direct with the physical brain, and thus control the lower nature and work out its purposes. Men will be taught how, through concentration and meditation, they can ascertain knowledge for themselves, can develop the intuition, and thus draw upon the resources of the Ego. Then will men be taught to think, to assume control of the mental body, and thus develop their latent powers.

(2) The true education is consequently the science of linking up the integral parts of man, and also of linking him up in turn with his immediate environment, and then with the greater whole in which he has to play his part. Each aspect, regarded as a lower aspect, can ever be simply the expression of the next higher. In this phrase I have expressed a fundamental truth which embodies not only the objective, but also indicates the problem before all interested in education. This problem is to gauge rightly the centre of the focus of a man’s attention, and to note where the consciousness is primarily centered. Then he must be trained in such a way that a shift of that focus into a higher vehicle becomes possible. We can also express this idea in an equally true manner by saying that the vehicle which seems of paramount importance, can become and should become of secondary importance, as it becomes simply the instrument of that which is higher than itself.

(3) Towards this consummation all education should tend: Response to the Thinker or the soul. With the registration of this response, the man enters into his kingdom. The above and the below become as one. The objective and the subjective worlds are unified. Soul and its mechanism function as a unit.

(4) The Atlanteans had no educational system as we understand the term. The kings and priests intuited; the masses obeyed.

(5) The world itself is a great fusing pot, out of which the One Humanity is emerging. This necessitates a drastic change in our methods of presenting history and geography. Science has always been universal. Great art and literature have always belonged to the world. It is upon these facts that the education to be given to the children of the world must be built – upon our similarities, our creative achievements, our spiritual idealisms, and our points of contact. Unless this is done, the wounds of the nations will never be healed, and the barriers which have existed for centuries will never be removed.

(6) Two major ideas should be taught to the children of every country. They are: the value of the individual and the fact of the one humanity.

(7) The first effort of education to civilise the child, will be to train and rightly direct his instincts.

The second obligation upon the educators will be to bring about his true culture, by training him to use his intellect rightly.

The third duty of education will be to evoke and to develop the intuition.

When these three are developed and functioning, you will have a civilised, cultured and spiritually awakened human being. A man will then be instinctively correct, intellectually sound, and intuitively aware. His soul, his mind, and his brain will be functioning as they should and in right relation to each other, thus again producing co-ordination and correct alignment.

(8) One of our immediate educational objectives must be the elimination of the competitive spirit, and the substitution of the co-operative consciousness.

(9) What. . . should be the effort on the part of parents and educators? First, and above everything else, the effort should be made to provide the atmosphere wherein certain qualities can flourish and emerge.

1. An atmosphere of love, wherein fear is cast out and the child realises he has no cause for timidity, shyness or caution, and one in which he receives courteous treatment at the hands of others, and is expected also to render equally courteous treatment in return. . . . Love always draws forth what is best in child and man.

2. An atmosphere of patience, wherein the child can become, normally and naturally, a seeker after the light of knowledge; wherein he is sure of always meeting with a quick response to inquiry, and a careful reply to all questions, and wherein there is never the sense of speed or hurry. . . . This impatience on the part of those upon whom they are so pathetically dependent, sows in them the seeds of irritation, and more lives are ruined by irritation than can be counted.

3. An atmosphere of ordered activity, wherein the child can learn the first rudiments of responsibility. The children who are coming into incarnation at this time, and who can profit by the new type of education, are necessarily on the very verge of soul consciousness. One of the first indications of such soul contact is a rapidly developing sense of responsibility. This should be carefully borne in mind, for the shouldering of small duties and the sharing of responsibilities (which is always concerned with some form of group relation) is a potent factor in determining a child’s character and future vocation.

4. An atmosphere of understanding, wherein a child is always sure that the reasons and motives for his actions will be recognised, and that those who are his older associates will always comprehend the nature of his motivating impulses, even though they may not always approve of what he has done, or of his activities . . .

It is the older generation who foster in a child an early and most unnecessary sense of guilt, of sinfulness and of wrongdoing. So much emphasis is laid upon petty little things that are not really wrong, but are annoying to the parent or teacher, that a true sense of wrong (which is the recognition of failure to preserve right relations with the group) gets overlaid and is not recognised for what it is. The many small and petty sins, imposed upon the children by the constant reiteration of “No”, by the use of the word “naughty”, and based largely on parental failure to understand and occupy the child, are of no real moment. If these aspects of the child’s life are rightly handled, then the truly wrong things, the infringements upon the rights of others, . . . the hurting or damaging of others in order to achieve personal gain, will emerge in right perspective and at the right time.

(10) In the future, education will make a far wider use of psychology than heretofore.

(11) A better educational system should, therefore, be worked out which will present the possibilities of human living in such a manner that barriers will be broken down, prejudices removed, and a training given to the developing child which will enable him, when grownup, to live with other men in harmony and goodwill. This can be done, if patience and understanding are developed and if educators realise that “where there is no vision, the people perish”.

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